Word recognition, word attack, decoding/phonetic analysis, and phonology instruction:

  • Students that find it difficult to analyze the unknown word may often be presented with a multisensory, step-by-step structured phonetic approach. Programs such as those presented via an Orton-Gillingham methodology are utilized. These programs may include but certainly are not limited to The Wilson Reading Program, The Slant Reading Program, and/or Project Read.
  • Lindamood-Bell educational programs are also used to further develop word recognition, word attack, decoding/phonetic analysis, phonological processing. These programs also improve auditory memory, auditory analysis, synthesis and discrimination.

Vocabulary development:

  • In addition to the study of word meanings, synonyms, antonyms, word analogies, context clues, and etymology, students learn to visualize the term and discuss the meaning.
  • Lindamood-Bell materials and computer programs such as: Visualizing and Verbalizing are used to further vocabulary development and concept imagery.

Reading comprehension and comprehension recall:

  • Reading comprehension is taught using a variety of materials that help the student not only understand what s/he is learning but also remember what is read. To improve reading comprehension, students may be taught:

Metacognition or metacomprehension skills to develop the ability to concentrate on what is read. The student should be taught to:

    • Read the title, boldface headings, and hypothesize what might happen.
    • Read the first page or paragraph and hypothesize what might happen next.
    • Continually question what will happen. Learn to generate questions as the material is read and guess what might happen.
    • Summarize context as it is read. Reevaluate personal predictions at the end of each section or chapter.
    • Obtaining literal meanings: understand details, ways to secure main ideas, recall sequence, and follow written directions.
  • Understand implied meanings: understand characterization and setting, sense relationships, predict outcomes, draw conclusions, and make generalizations.
  • Creative reading (going beyond author’s message): such as the ability to use the author’s and reader’s ideas to solve a problem and the ability to use author’s ideas as a springboard to new ideas.

We offer tutorial programs in the following areas:

Reading 

  • Remedial Reading: Teaches basic skills to students not reading up to grade level.
  • Developmental Reading: Reinforces & further develops reading abilities.
  • Reading Readiness & Pre-First Grade Reading: Taught to give your child that additional boost and self-confidence to enter first grade knowing they can read.
  • Phonics, Comprehension Strategies and Vocabulary
  • Reading Enrichment: Broadens literary background, study skills and reading experiences for good students.
  • Speed Reading: Designed to help your read faster with better understanding and recall of what you read.

Math

  • Arithmetic Skills, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Problem Solving, Logic

Language Arts

  • Composition, Spelling, Grammar, Creative Writing (short stories, plays, poetry), essays

Study Skills

  • Organizational Skills
  • Methods for improving recall and memory
  • How to study short stories and novels as well as textbooks
  • Note-taking techniques
  • How to study for test a test and how to take a test

Content Subjects

  • Tutoring is available for all subjects and all ages
  • Foreign Languages and Computer Instruction

A variety of class times are available after school hours, evenings, and Saturdays. During the summer months, classes are also available during the morning as well as the afternoons and evenings. Our classes consist of one instructor for every one to three students. Some students are also tutored on a one-to-one basis, just the instructor and the student.


How do you instruct students?

  • A personalized program of instruction is written for each student and individualized instruction is provided based upon the student’s learning strengths as well as his/her weaknesses and personal needs.
  • The student is taught the way that student may learn best.  
  • The programs of instruction as well as the individual materials that are used are selected to match the student’s personal needs and the way they most efficiently process information.

 
What types of materials and/or instructional programs do you use?

  • The materials and instructional programs that are used to reinforce individualized skill instruction are scientifically research based materials that have been proven to be highly effective and efficient for skill development.
  • Multisensory methodologies are used as well as hands-on experiential learning to instruct students

What types of testing/strategies are available for students with of dyslexia?

A Psychoeducational Evaluation is completed to assist in identifying Dyslexia. A Psychoeducational Evaluation assesses the following areas:

  • Cognitive/Intelligence
  • Auditory and visual processing
  • Visual–motor integration
  • Fine/gross motor processing
  • Academic achievement in reading, writing, mathematics, problem solving, science, social studies, humanities
  • Speech
  • Expressive and receptive language

The evaluation will provide information on how the student thinks, reasons, and learns. It will identify strengths and weaknesses in processing, as well as academics and grade level. A conference will be held with the family and/or the student. Individual strategies based on the student’s strengths and weaknesses are developed and presented at the conference. In addition, a program of personalized instruction is presented addressing dyslexia behaviors. 

Private Psychoeducational Evaluations are available.  Please contact us if you wish to schedule a consultation. 

What is dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a language-based learning disability. Dyslexia refers to a cluster of symptoms, which result in people having difficulties with specific language skills, particularly reading. Students with dyslexia usually experience difficulties with other language skills such as spelling, writing, and pronouncing words. Dyslexia affects individuals throughout their lives; however, its impact can change at different stages in a person’s life. It is referred to as a learning disability because dyslexia can make it very difficult for a student to succeed academically in the typical instructional environment, and in its more severe forms, will qualify a student for special education, special accommodations, or extra support services.

What causes dyslexia?

The exact causes of dyslexia are still not completely clear, but anatomical and brain imagery studies show differences in the way the brain of a dyslexic person develops and functions. Moreover, most people with dyslexia have been found to have problems with identifying the separate speech sounds within a word and/or learning how letters represent those sounds, a key factor in their reading difficulties. Dyslexia is not due to either lack of intelligence or desire to learn; with appropriate teaching methods, dyslexics can learn successfully.

What are the effects of dyslexia?

The impact that dyslexia has is different for each person and depends on the severity of the condition and the effectiveness of instruction or remediation. The core difficulty is with word recognition and reading fluency, spelling, and writing. Some dyslexics manage to learn early reading and spelling tasks, especially with excellent instruction, but later experience their most debilitating problems when more complex language skills are required, such as grammar, understanding textbook material, and writing essays.

People with dyslexia can also have problems with spoken language, even after they have been exposed to good language models in their homes and good language instruction in school. They may find it difficult to express themselves clearly, or to fully comprehend what others mean when they speak. Such language problems are often difficult to recognize, but they can lead to major problems in school, in the workplace, and in relating to other people. The effects of dyslexia reach well beyond the classroom.*

 

 

*Source: The International Dyslexia Association (IDA)

 

We offer programs for students of all performance levels including: Learning Disabilities (Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, Dyscalculia), Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD), Anxiety, Giftedness, and Autism in the Chicago, IL area. Our programs include psychoeducational testing & diagnostic services, private/semi-private tutoring, speech therapy, occupational therapy, ACT/SAT test preparation, and before and after school care. 

Instructional programs are designed to meet each student’s learning objectives in terms of his/her learning capacities. Students of all ages attend The Achievement Centers whether it is for an independent evaluation of their cognitive, processing, and academic skills and/or individualized instruction to further develop their skills. The Achievement Centers service:

  • Students of all ages (preschool through adult)
  • Students with learning disabilities (LD)
  • Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, Dyspraxia, and all learning exceptionalities
  • Those who need to improve reading, writing, mathematics, study skills, test taking and/or thinking and processing skills
  • Regular education and/or accelerated students
  • Gifted learners
  • Underachievers
  • Students with a nonverbal learning disability (NVLD)
  • High Functioning Autism
  • Students that have an Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD/ADHD)

What types of testing/strategies are available for students with ADD/ADHD?

A Psychoeducational Evaluation is completed to assist in identifying an attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity or to rule it out. A Psychoeducational Evaluation assesses the following areas:

  • Cognitive/Intelligence
  • Auditory and visual processing
  • Visual–motor integration
  • Fine/gross motor processing
  • Academic achievement in reading, writing, mathematics, problem solving, science, social studies, humanities
  • Speech
  • Expressive and receptive language

The evaluation will provide information on how the student thinks, reasons, and learns. It will identify strengths and weaknesses in processing, as well as academics and grade level. A conference will be held with the family and/or the student. Individual strategies based on the student’s strengths and weaknesses are developed and presented at the conference. In addition, a program of personalized instruction is presented addressing ADD/ADHD behaviors. 

Private Psychoeducational Evaluations are available.  Please contact us if you wish to schedule a consultation. 

What is ADHD?

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurobiological condition affecting 5-8 percent of school age children with symptoms persisting into adulthood in as many as 60 percent of cases (i.e. approximately 4% of adults). 

In most cases, ADHD is thought to be inherited, and tends to run in some families more than others. ADHD is a lifespan condition that affects children, adolescents, and adults of all ages. It affects both males and females, and people of all races and cultural backgrounds.*

Some common symptoms and problems of living with ADHD include:

  • Poor attention; excessive distractibility
  • Physical restlessness or hyperactivity
  • Excessive impulsivity; saying or doing things without thinking
  • Excessive and chronic procrastination
  • Difficulty getting started on tasks
  • Difficulty completing tasks
  • Frequently losing things
  • Poor organization, planning, and time management skills
  • Excessive forgetfulness

Symptoms of Inattention:

  • Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
  • Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
  • Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
  • Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
  • Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
  • Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort
  • Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities
  • Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
  • Is often forgetful in daily activities

Symptoms of Hyperactivity:

  • Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
  • Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
  • Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness)
  • Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
  • Is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"
  • Often talks excessively

Symptoms of Impulsivity 

  • Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
  • Often has difficulty awaiting turn
  • Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games) *

 

*Source: Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD)